Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Nurturing my budding entrepreneur

Last July, I went to a workshop about encouraging entrepreneurship in our kids. I was interested because one of my sons always has a bunch of ideas. So I figured this workshop would help me find a better way to respond to these ideas, rather than brushing them off.

One point that really stuck with me was that it was OK to fail. The speaker, Shirley Solis, shared her entrepreneurial endeavors before she and her husband became owners of Lifetime Books and Gifts. What I realized is that sometimes we can make mistakes along the way, but we can also take those experiences and learn what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur. If anything, I realized how much my life had been consumed by trying to protect myself from failure or disappointment. Honestly, it wasn't working. In fact, it was flowing over into my parenting. I always had a reason for why my son's ideas would not work. Frankly, I was more concerned about whether it would affect his confidence if no one cared about his creations. But brushing his ideas off isn't much of a confidence builder either.

Just maybe this ambitious little guy is just like me. I too get carried away with a bunch of ideas. But most of them come and go without ever materializing, without affecting my confidence. Even when my ideas didn't become the next best thing, I really enjoyed the process. And so maybe it will be the same with him. Besides, I might miss out on some of the funniest moments in their lives.

How do you handle situations like this?


  1. You can never succeed if you don't even try. And part of growing is to learn from our mistakes. If you fail, you sit back and take an objective look at what went right & what went wrong then make proper adjustments when you try again.
    Good luck & best wishes for the kids also enjoying the process.

  2. Hi Holly,

    You're right. I felt like I was over analyzing what went wrong in some events over the past few years. I just had to accept that was the way things happened and it was time to move on. I had made it too subjective.